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Daylight & Architecture

The future is green
Conference center and
hotel extension in Rønne

Nowhere in Denmark does the sun rise earlier than on Bornholm – and the Baltic Sea island would also like to be the first part of the country that meets its energy needs from completely carbon-neutral renewable sources. The ‘Green Solution House’ in the south of the island's main town, Rønne, is a lighthouse project for this turnaround. The former Hotel Ryttergården from 1973 has been renovated, supplemented with a congress centre and equipped with numerous forward-looking solutions from the fields of architecture and building technology. Three sustainability concepts were at the centre of the building design: DGNB certification, the cradle-to-cradle principle aimed at a circular flow economy, and the Active House Standard, which focusses on a healthy indoor climate and an excellent supply of daylight.
    The results of this strategy are apparent to visitors everywhere they go. In many places, recycled materials were used; there are carpets that clean the air and a small bioreactor in which algae are used to clean the hotel's waste water. Above all, however, daylight and the coastal landscape are omnipresent all round the inside of the building. The hotel rooms receive light through the flat roof windows and via the balconies, which have been fitted with new glass balustrades. Above the foyer, there is a folded glass roof composed of modular skylights, some of which are fitted with solar cells and thus contribute to the power supply. And thanks to large glass facades, the sunlight can exert its invigorating effect on listeners and speakers even in the conference rooms.


Location:
Strandvejen 79, Rønne, Denmark
Architects:
3XN, Copenhagen
Steenbergs Tegnestue, Rønne
Sustainability consultants:
GXN Innovation, Copenhagen
The future is green - Daylight and Architecture Magazine
The future is green - Daylight and Architecture Magazine
The future is green - Daylight and Architecture Magazine
The future is green - Daylight and Architecture Magazine
The future is green - Daylight and Architecture Magazine
The future is green - Daylight and Architecture Magazine
The future is green - Daylight and Architecture Magazine

DAYLIGHT MATTER(S)

ISSUE 26


Daylight has great impact on our health and happiness. It enriches our everyday lives with sensual pleasure. In fact daylight matters to all of us. The current issue of Daylight/Architecture discusses the vital importance of natural light from a variety of viewpoints.

In his essay, Juhani Pallasmaa describes how daylight interacts with our senses, and how great architects have harnessed this interplay to create memorable spaces, where light almost becomes a material of its own. Read more(link til atiklen) The impact of daylight on our health and wellbeing is discussed by Deborah Burnett in her article. She gives an update on recent research, that has found more pathways through which light exposure influences our sleep/wake cycles, hormone production, performance and alertness levels. Peter Holzer argues in his article, that designers should take the long-term health effects of buildings into account. This would imply allowing much more daylight in buildings. Read more (link til artikel).

The magazine features four buildings as examples of the interplay of light, human health and wellbeing. Photographers Adam Mørk and Daniel Blaufuks seek to capture the magic that natural light gives to the building’s atmospheres and does to the bodies and minds of people living, working and learning in buildings.

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